Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Kitchen Cabinets: The 4 Most Popular Paint Colors

  Painted kitchen cabinets came back with a bang! It was not too long ago when pretty much everyone turned away from those vintage and retro hues and adopted a more modern approach toward kitchen cabinets. Beige, cream and brown became the order of the day. But then, fashion and interior design always have a wonderful way of surprising us by turning back the clock and making the vintage cool again! Colorful kitchen cabinets are quickly topping the list of the hottest design trends of 2014 and are set to stay on trend for 2015.
  

  Purple: It is the color of the year, after all. Purples and violets have been all the rage in the last few years, and every major fashion company and interior design giant predicts that these colors will continue to stay relevant in the next few years to come. Purple looks especially stunning in any setting that it is placed and instantly gives the room visual richness that is simply unmistakable. While purple has a lot going for it, painting your kitchen cabinets purple means that you should pay particular attention to the surrounding decor and matching hues. If you love an eclectic look, this is barely a problem.













 Grey: We've said that grey is the new black. But now we hear that it's "the hottest neutral on the planet today." If you are starting to feel like grey is becoming more prominent all around you, then your observation is spot on. While many homeowners feel that grey for kitchen cabinets can be dull, that is hardly the truth. Warm, deep greys add sophistication and style with ease. But to truly experience the magic of grey cabinets in the kitchen, opt for textured finishes and hip patterns that elevate the cabinets in a sleek and minimal home.












White: There are a lot of folks who quickly raise an eyebrow when we tell them that white can be as engaging a color for kitchen cabinets as any. But the inspirations featured here will quickly change your mind. A simple yet cleverly done kitchen in white can make a perfect backdrop for any accent color you wish to include. Painting kitchen shelves white helps accentuate this appeal. You can obviously pair white kitchen cabinets with any other backsplash of your choice. If you have a problem committing to an accent color, this is the best way to ease your nerves.





















Black: Black is not one of the first colors that come to mind when thinking about new kitchen cabinets. Yet it is probably the most natural fit in any contemporary kitchen with clean and well-defined lines and glossy, lacquered surfaces. Bringing together both black and white kitchen shelves is a classic design choice that will never let you down. A more daring approach to using black would be to couple it with dashing red that is equally audacious and prominent. Posh and urbane, black is for those who love a hint of minimalism in their kitchen.


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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Designing & Remodeling A Small Master Bath

Dreaming Of A Newly Designed Or Remodeled Bathroom? 

From classical to modern, Mediterranean to rustic - when selecting the feel of your new bathroom the options are endless. Even if you think your update is a simple one, a design professional from AK with over 17-years of experience can help you plan and complete your project most effectively. For most of us, laying out a master bathroom is a part of a remodeling project where we’re trying to make the most of limited square footage.

Here are tips for getting the most out of limited square footage:

A central door improves the layout

Small bathrooms often have a door on the narrow end of a rectangular space, and all the fixtures are arranged along one wall—the unappealing hallway approach. Architect Lynn Hopkins has found that a central door is a more efficient use of space because she can locate fixtures in alcoves on each side of the entry for a more roomlike feel. With this arrangement, the entry space pulls double duty as part of the user area for more than one fixture. In a small bathroom, pedestal, console, or wall-mounted sinks make the room appear larger.

A master bath, not a massive bath

Instead of planning a large bathroom with every imaginable convenience, you’re better off saving space for the sleeping area, a closet/dressing area, or even a small office alcove if you’re willing to bring that part of your life into the bedroom. Not only is it space you’re more likely to use and appreciate daily, but you’ll also have more money for the fixtures, fittings, and tile that you touch several times a day. You can fit an efficient, comfortable bathroom in a footprint as small as 5 ft. by 8 ft. if a sink, toilet, and shower meet your needs. A double vanity and tub/shower combo stretch the minimum-space requirements to about 8 ft. by 9 ft.
Code requirements dictate the minimum amount of space required for each element in the bathroom, but you’ll find that adding a few extra inches of elbow room or legroom around the fixtures makes the room seem disproportionately larger than the small increase in its footprint. For example, code requires a clear 21 in. in front of sinks and toilets. But 24 in. is an improvement, and 30 in. creates a very comfortable space. As you lay out possible fixture locations, remember that the clear spaces around fixtures can overlap; it’s not as if you’ll be using the toilet and the sink at the same time. Extending the maneuvering room around a fixture much beyond 36 in. is a waste of space because you’ll start to feel unmoored from the surrounding elements.

A direct connection to the bedroom

This arrangement with closets in the sleeping area and a direct connection to the bathroom works for a couple with similar schedules. Although the bathroom and the bedroom open directly onto each other without any buffer, a thoughtful layout visually insulates the two rooms from each other. From the bed, it is impossible to see into the bathroom, and a half wall shields the toilet from view when looking directly through the doorway.
Placing the bathroom door far from the bedroom entry reinforces the idea that the master bath is a private space. By opting for a smaller bathroom in this project, architect Russell Hamlet had space for a laundry room in the heart of dirty-laundry territory, which further insulates the bath from the public areas of the house.
To figure out how much space to allocate for the bathroom, grab a piece of paper and a pen, and sit down with your partner. Do you have similar schedules, or does one of you head to bed or get up much earlier than the other? When someone is asleep, a dressing area lets you turn on the lights to disrobe or to find clothes. How often do you find yourselves vying for the sink and the mirror at the same time? A double vanity eats up valuable real estate. What’s your daily routine? If you shower before work in the morning, you can skip a tub in the master bath, but if you soak each night, a tub is mandatory.
When you create a master suite, you have two basic options: The bathroom door can open directly from the sleeping area into the bathroom; or a closet, a dressing area, or a foyer can serve as a buffer. The examples on these pages are by no means the only options, but they highlight some design issues and should spark ideas as you lay out your own master bath.

Dressing-area buffer zone

For this remodel, architect Lynn Hopkins created a dressing area by adding a wall with built-in storage at the head of the bed. Now when you enter the master suite, you have the choice of heading right for the bathroom, left for the bedroom, or straight for a fresh change of clothes.
Appropriating space from an adjoining closet to create a niche for a toilet or a sink is one method of gaining precious floor space in a small bathroom. Here, the loss of closet space is barely noticeable, but the area in front of the toilet and the sink feels much more spacious. By stealing an extra 18 in. from the closet, the linen shelves next to the toilet offer convenient storage for towels and toilet paper so that a moment of forgetfulness doesn’t require a trip outside the bathroom.

Where To Start 

Our happy clients are our best advertising - if you'd like to hear what AK's real clients had to say about working with AK Complete Home Renovations, read our Customer Reviews here.
See national third-party surveyor, GuildQuality's report on AK Complete Home Renovations. Gaining a level of comfort and trust are the first steps in finding the right remodeling company to work with!
Next, to assist you in planning for your new bath, AK has created a Bath Planning Questionnaire so our design team will know exactly where to begin! Filling out this questionnaire is completely optional, but we have found that the questions help our clients gain insight into their needs for their new space.
 
http://www.akatlanta.com/contact.asp
 

Friday, July 11, 2014

Danver Introduces Shelves Worthy Of Your Kitchen



Photography: Chris Dreith, Improvements Group 

Dress up your interior kitchen or outdoor kitchen space, 
with stainless steel floating shelves!



Uniquely designed and very sturdy, the floating shelves are completely finished from every angle. An internal bracket is attached to the wall and the stainless steel self fits around the bracket and locks into place conveying a "floating" appearance.

Size Specifications:
10" deep x 2.5" thick,
and come in standard widths of:
18", 24", 30", 36", 42", 48", 60" and 72"

 
  
For more information, send us an email here!